Gerardo Ortiz

IQC Associate, Professor, University of Indiana in Bloomington
Gerardo Ortiz

Gerardo is in the Physics Department at the University of Indiana in Bloomington and also an affiliate member with the Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory. The quest to explore the ultimate limits and principles of quantum physics is out there. Quantum technologies are no longer a theorist's dream. For example, commercial quantum cryptography devices have become available. I am interested in studying foundational, software, and hardware aspects of quantum computation and information. Because of the exciting recent development of new algorithms, such as Shor's factoring and Grover's quantum search, that solve difficult problems on a quantum computer using algorithms that would be impractical on a classical computer, it is easy to overlook the fact that Feynman's original proposal for quantum computers was for the purpose of solving quantum physics problems. Simulation of physical phenomena using quantum devices is one of my areas of research. I am also concerned with topics of potential overlap between my two research disciplines, where feedback from one field may help to resolve significant problems in the other. After all, a quantum computer is a quantum many-body system. What are the concepts from quantum information that one can use to study or predict phenomena in condensed matter physics? Similarly, what concepts can be borrowed from condensed matter to quantify measures of information? These are fundamental open questions. Designing and building a quantum computer or a quantum simulator is a ultimate example of topics that meet the boundaries of both disciplines. Cold atom physics is another.